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Tuesday, September 6

  1. page US_WomenInPhilosophy edited ... Mary Briody Mahowald is Professor Emerita at the University of Chicago. Her books include An I…
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    Mary Briody Mahowald is Professor Emerita at the University of Chicago. Her books include An Idealistic Pragmatism: The Development of the Pragmatic Element in Josiah Royce (1972), Women and Children in Health Care (1993), Philosophy of Woman: Classical to Current Concepts (1978, '83, '94), Disability, Difference, Discrimination: Perspectives on Justice in Bioethics and Public Policy (co-authored with Anita Silvers and David Wasserman, 1998), Genes Women, Equality (2000), Genetics in the Clinic: Clinical, Ethical, and Social Implications for Primary Care (co-edited with V McKusick, A. Scheuerle, and T. Aspinwall, 2001), and Bioethics and Women: Across the Life Span (2006).
    Chaone Mallory is Assistant Professor of Environmental Philosophy at Villanova University, where she teaches courses in environmental ethics, environmental philosophy, ecofeminism, and the environment and social, political, and cultural thought. She received her Ph.D. in 2006 from the University of Oregon in Environmental Science, Studies, and Policy with Philosophy as the focal department. Prior to that, she earned an M.A. in Philosophy with a concentration in Environmental Ethics from the University of North Texas, where she studied under founding members of the field; including Max Oelschlaeger, J. Baird Callicott, and Eugene C. Hargrove. Her research effects an engagement between the disciplines of environmental philosophy, feminism, political theory, and law; and contributes to an emerging discourse of ecofeminist political philosophy. Her publications include "Ecofeminism and Forest Defense in Cascadia: Gender, Theory and Radical Activism" published in Capitalism, Nature, Socialism. 17 (1):32-49, 2006 and "Acts of Objectification and the Repudiation of Dominance: Leopold, Ecofeminism, and the Ecological Narrative" published in Ethics & the Environment. 6 (2):59-89; 2001. Her dissertation focused on questions of political representation, subjectivity, and inclusion for women, communities of color, and the more-than-human world. She is interested in ways that philosophical debates over political representation are relevant to ecofeminist political projects, including ecofeminist envisionings of species-inclusive dialogical democracy. A second major area of current research interest concerns women’s and transgender direct action forest defense movements and how such activisms embody a theory/praxis dialectic. In addition to her scholarly activities, Chaone occassionally presents workshops on ecofeminism to activist and community groups outside of academia; her work is very informed by these interactions.
    Lori Martindale is an Instructor in Gender and Sexuality Studies and Honors departments at Western Washington University. Lori is a Ph.D. from The European Graduate School in Switzerland, and is the author of On Leaving: Poetry, Daesthetics, Timelessness.
    Jennifer Matey is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the Florida International University. She is interested in various issues in the philosophy of mind, philosophical foundations of psychology and cognitive science, epistemology, metaphysics and feminist philosophy. She is currently writing on epistemological and metaphysical issues related to perception.
    Noëlle McAfee is professor of philosophy at Emory University. Her work is in ethics; democratic theory; feminism; pragmatism; and continental philosophy. She has been the director of both the Gender Studies program and the Honors Program at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. She is the author of Democracy and the Political Unconscious (Columbia University Press); Habermas, Kristeva, and Citizenship (Cornell University Press, 2000); and Julia Kristeva (Routledge, 2004). She co-edited, with James Veninga, Standing with the Public: the Humanities and Democratic Practice (Kettering Foundation Press). Her articles have appeared in the journals Philosophy and Social Criticism, Philosophy Today, the Journal of Speculative Philosophy, Hypatia, and Semiotica. Her essay "Two Feminisms" is the subject of the Fall 2007 Symposium on Gender, Race and Philosophy. She is associate editor of the Kettering Review and co-editor, with Claire Snyder, of the Fall 2007 special issue of the feminist philosophy journal Hypatia on feminist engagements in democratic theory. She is also an associate of the Kettering Foundation. She blogs occasionally at gonepublic: philosophy, politics, and public life. nmcafee@gmu.edu
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Monday, March 16

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Wednesday, January 22

  1. page US_WomenInPhilosophy edited ... Jennifer Lawson is a former graduate student the University of North Florida. She attended Ste…
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    Jennifer Lawson is a former graduate student the University of North Florida. She attended Stetson University as an undergraduate, where she began reading, and developed deep interests in, ethics, epistemology, feminist philosophy, metaphysics and logic. She has special interests in Wittgenstein and Kierkegaard, having studied under several scholars of both. She attended the University of North Florida and completed everything but her Master's thesis because of medical reasons. Having severe and broad Obsessive-Complusive Disorder, Ms Lawson has had to seek treatment, including being hospitalized and medicated, to treat her severe OCD, which has gotten better with medication and therapy. At the University of North Florida, she developed an interest in Bernard Williams, and had the privilige of being a research assistant for the book Reading Bernard Williams.
    Emily S. Lee is Associate Professor of philosophy at California State University at Fullerton. Her research interests include feminist philosophy, philosophy of race and phenomenology, especially the works of Maurice Merleau-Ponty. She has an anthology, Living Alterities: Phenomenology, Embodiment, and Race forthcoming from SUNY Press. She has published articles on phenomenology and epistemology in regards to the embodiment and subjectivity of women of color in journals including: Hypatia: a Journal of Feminist Philosophy, The Southern Journal of Philosophy, and Philosophy Today. She served as the Executive Secretary for the Society for Women in Philosophy, Pacific Division. She is currently working on a book concerning the phenomenology of race.
    Wendy Lynne Lee is professor of philosophy at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania where she has taught for more than 20 years. Her areas of specialization include philosophy of language, philosophy of of sexual identity, feminist theory, philosophy of ecology, ecological aesthetics, philosophy of mind/brain, and philosophy of animal cognition/welfare/rights. Her book publications include On Marx (2001), Contemporary Feminist Theory and Activism (2010 ), and the forthcoming Manifesto for an Ecological Humanism (2015). She has published her some 40 scholarly pieces in Apieron, Hypatia, Ethics and the Environment, Environmental Philosophy, Environmental Ethics, and Nature + Culture, among other journals and anthologies. She is co-editing an issue of The International Journal of Feminist BioEthics with Laura Purdy on the implications for health and welfare of extreme forms of fossil fuel extraction. She has given Pennsylvania State House testimony opposing legislation to codify heterosexuality as the only recognized marital union in that state's constitution. She also has a very active life as a dissident, activist, and grass roots organizer, particularly on issues that affect women, nonhuman animals, indigenous peoples, and the economically marginalized. She is currently on the executive committee for the Shale Justice Coalition, and writes a regular blog, THE WRENCH, concerning the environmental, economic, and social justice consequences of fossil fuel extraction and consumption. Her blog work is frequently posted at Raging Chicken Press, ShaleShock, and Pennsylvania Frack. She regularly works with her activist counterparts struggling against multinational energy corporations in other states as well as other countries, including Romania, India, France, and Ireland. She has been featured and/or cited for her effort to make good on Karl Marx' claim that the point of philosophy is not merely to know the world but to change it for the better in The American Prospect, Mother Jones, The Huffington Post, State Impact Pennsylvania, PublicSource, Shale Reporter, Democracy NOW, and BURN. She is also one of the most active photo-documentarians of the Pennsylvania anti-fracking movement, and regularly includes her photographs of drilling operations, ecological devastation, protests, and public hearings in her invited public presentations, for example, "The Good Ole' Boy Extraction Club" at Susquehanna University and at SUNY Cortland. Her photographs are available on her FLICKR page. She is an active union member in APSCUF (The Association of Pennsylvania College and University Faculty), and drafted it's position statement opposing all forms of extreme fossil fuel extraction on public college and university lands and campuses. She also helped to organize, blog, and photo-document the Occupation of Riverdale--one of the key galvanizing actions of the Pennsylvania anti-fracking movement, during which she had the privilege of having long and rich philosophical discussions with her fellows during the midnight to 3AM security shifts.
    //Hilde Lindemann// is Professor of Philosophy at Michigan State University. She is the editor of Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, and coeditor (with Sara Ruddick and Margaret Urban Walker) of Rowman & Littlefield’s Feminist Constructions series. She has also been the general coeditor (with James Lindemann Nelson) of the Reflective Bioethics series at Routledge. Her books include An Invitation to Feminist Ethics (McGraw-Hill 2005) and, as Hilde Lindemann Nelson, Damaged Identities, Narrative Repair (Cornell University Press 2001). With James Lindemann Nelson she coauthored Alzheimer’s: Answers to Hard Questions for Families (Doubleday 1996) and The Patient in the Family (Routledge 1995), and she has also edited three collections: Feminism and Families and Stories and Their Limits: Narrative Approaches to Bioethics (both Routledge 1997), and, with Marian Verkerk and Margaret Urban Walker, Naturalized Bioethics (Cambridge 2008). A Fellow of the Hastings Center, her ongoing research interests are in feminist bioethics, feminist ethics, the ethics of families, and the social construction of persons and their identities.
    Mary Briody Mahowald is Professor Emerita at the University of Chicago. Her books include An Idealistic Pragmatism: The Development of the Pragmatic Element in Josiah Royce (1972), Women and Children in Health Care (1993), Philosophy of Woman: Classical to Current Concepts (1978, '83, '94), Disability, Difference, Discrimination: Perspectives on Justice in Bioethics and Public Policy (co-authored with Anita Silvers and David Wasserman, 1998), Genes Women, Equality (2000), Genetics in the Clinic: Clinical, Ethical, and Social Implications for Primary Care (co-edited with V McKusick, A. Scheuerle, and T. Aspinwall, 2001), and Bioethics and Women: Across the Life Span (2006).
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Tuesday, November 5

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Monday, November 4

  1. page US_WomenInPhilosophy edited ... Chaone Mallory is Assistant Professor of Environmental Philosophy at Villanova University, whe…
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    Chaone Mallory is Assistant Professor of Environmental Philosophy at Villanova University, where she teaches courses in environmental ethics, environmental philosophy, ecofeminism, and the environment and social, political, and cultural thought. She received her Ph.D. in 2006 from the University of Oregon in Environmental Science, Studies, and Policy with Philosophy as the focal department. Prior to that, she earned an M.A. in Philosophy with a concentration in Environmental Ethics from the University of North Texas, where she studied under founding members of the field; including Max Oelschlaeger, J. Baird Callicott, and Eugene C. Hargrove. Her research effects an engagement between the disciplines of environmental philosophy, feminism, political theory, and law; and contributes to an emerging discourse of ecofeminist political philosophy. Her publications include "Ecofeminism and Forest Defense in Cascadia: Gender, Theory and Radical Activism" published in Capitalism, Nature, Socialism. 17 (1):32-49, 2006 and "Acts of Objectification and the Repudiation of Dominance: Leopold, Ecofeminism, and the Ecological Narrative" published in Ethics & the Environment. 6 (2):59-89; 2001. Her dissertation focused on questions of political representation, subjectivity, and inclusion for women, communities of color, and the more-than-human world. She is interested in ways that philosophical debates over political representation are relevant to ecofeminist political projects, including ecofeminist envisionings of species-inclusive dialogical democracy. A second major area of current research interest concerns women’s and transgender direct action forest defense movements and how such activisms embody a theory/praxis dialectic. In addition to her scholarly activities, Chaone occassionally presents workshops on ecofeminism to activist and community groups outside of academia; her work is very informed by these interactions.
    Jennifer Matey is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the Florida International University. She is interested in various issues in the philosophy of mind, philosophical foundations of psychology and cognitive science, epistemology, metaphysics and feminist philosophy. She is currently writing on epistemological and metaphysical issues related to perception.
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    McAfee is associate professor of
    Linda López McAlister, Professor Emerita of Philosophy and Women’s Studies at the University of South Florida, earned her A.B. in philosophy from Barnard College in 1961 and her Ph.D. from Cornell in 1969. She taught and was an administrator at Brooklyn College, the CUNY Graduate Center, San Diego State, and the University of South Florida. She was a founding member of Eastern SWIP in the late 1960s and then, while a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Würzburg in 1974, she organized a meeting of German and American women philosophers out of which emerged the International Association of Women Philosophers (IAPh). That meeting introduced her to the work of Edith Stein, Hedwig Conrad-Martius, and Gerda Walther and to the history of women philosophers, in general. She was General Editor of Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy from 1990 to 1998 and was the founder of the SWIP-List. In 1998 she was honored by Eastern SWIP as a Distinguished Woman Philosopher. She has written, translated and or edited a number of books on Franz Brentano, the history of women in philosophy, and feminist philosophy. Now living in New Mexico, she has a new career as a producer and director of stage and radio plays in Albuquerque and in Mexico through her company Camino Real Productions LLC. //mcalisterll@comcast.net//
    //Mary Kate McGowan// s an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Wellesley College. She received her M.A. and Ph. D. at Princeton University. Her research interests include metaphysics (metaphysical realism, grue paradox), feminism and issues at the intersection of language and law. She has recently done work on speech acts and free speech. //mmcgowan@wellesley.edu//
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Wednesday, August 7

  1. page US_WomenInPhilosophy edited ... Marianne Janack is the Sidney Wertimer Associate Professor of Philosophy at Hamilton College. …
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    Marianne Janack is the Sidney Wertimer Associate Professor of Philosophy at Hamilton College. She received her A.B. from Colgate University and her M.A. and Ph.d. from Syracuse University, where her dissertation supervisor was Linda MartÍn Alcoff. Her research interests are primarily in the areas of feminist epistemology, philosophy of science, and theories of identity. She is the editor of Feminist Interpretations of Richard Rorty (forthcoming in the Re-reading the Canon Series from the Penn State University Press) and is the author of several articles on the concept of objectivity:
    Leigh M. Johnson is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Rhodes College (Memphis, TN). She received her Ph.D. in Philosophy from The Pennsylvania State University in 2007, with a doctoral minor in African and African-American Studies. Her research specializes in social and political philosophy, 19th/20th/21st C. Continental philosophy, and theories of race and gender. She has published on human rights, truth commissions, and democratic theory in such journals as International Studies in Philosophy and Philosophy and Social Criticism. She maintains a philosophy and politics blog at ReadMoreWriteMoreThinkMoreBeMore, which she has done since 2006. In August 2009, she was interviewed for Dr. Chris Long's "Socratic Politics in Digital Dialogue" for an episode discussing her recent work on "Humanism."
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    Jolles is AssistantAssociate Professor of
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    from Temple University in 2003.University. Her research
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    in Hypatia; Feminist Formations; Critical Matrix:
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    Feminist Teacher; and The American
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    Feminism and Philosophy; and The Dictionary of Modern American Philosophers. Her co-editedPhilosophy. She is editor (with Shira Tarrant) collection,of Fashion Talks:
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    Power of Style, will be published by SUNY Press in 2012.Style (SUNY Press, 2012). Her current book project, Women and Their Bodies, is a primer on contemporary feminist scholarship and debates on embodiment, power, and culture.
    Barrie Karp, artist, pioneer antiracist feminist educator teaching philosophy, cultural studies, humanities and arts in NYC colleges & universities since 1970. B.S., Philosophy, Columbia University, 1967. Ph.D. CUNY, Philosophy, 1979. Faculty Member, New School for Social Research since 1982. Faculty Member, Eugene Lang College the New School for Liberal Arts, since 1988. Faculty Member, School of Visual Arts, Department of Humanities & Sciences, Philosophy & Cultural Studies Track, since 1982. //barriekarp@gmail.com//
    Amy Kind is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Claremont McKenna College where she teaches courses in philosophy of mind, metaphysics, and logic. From 2005-2008 she served as Associate Dean of the Faculty, and she currently serves as Chair of of the Department of Philosophy. She received her PhD in Philosophy from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1997. Her research interests are primarily in the philosophy of mind, and she focuses primarily on issues relating to the imagination and to phenomenal consciousness. Some of her published work includes "Putting the Image Back in Imagination" (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 2001), "What's So Transparent About Transparency" (Philosophical Studies 2003), and "Restrictions on Representationalism" (Philosophical Studies 2007).
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Sunday, July 28

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Sunday, June 30

  1. page US_WomenInPhilosophy edited ... Jennifer Matey is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the Florida International University…
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    Jennifer Matey is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the Florida International University. She is interested in various issues in the philosophy of mind, philosophical foundations of psychology and cognitive science, epistemology, metaphysics and feminist philosophy. She is currently writing on epistemological and metaphysical issues related to perception.
    Noëlle McAfee is associate professor of philosophy at Emory University. Her work is in ethics; democratic theory; feminism; pragmatism; and continental philosophy. She has been the director of both the Gender Studies program and the Honors Program at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. She is the author of Democracy and the Political Unconscious (Columbia University Press); Habermas, Kristeva, and Citizenship (Cornell University Press, 2000); and Julia Kristeva (Routledge, 2004). She co-edited, with James Veninga, Standing with the Public: the Humanities and Democratic Practice (Kettering Foundation Press). Her articles have appeared in the journals Philosophy and Social Criticism, Philosophy Today, the Journal of Speculative Philosophy, Hypatia, and Semiotica. Her essay "Two Feminisms" is the subject of the Fall 2007 Symposium on Gender, Race and Philosophy. She is associate editor of the Kettering Review and co-editor, with Claire Snyder, of the Fall 2007 special issue of the feminist philosophy journal Hypatia on feminist engagements in democratic theory. She is also an associate of the Kettering Foundation. She blogs occasionally at gonepublic: philosophy, politics, and public life. nmcafee@gmu.edu
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    Feminist Philosophy
    from
    from 1990 to
    //Mary Kate McGowan// s an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Wellesley College. She received her M.A. and Ph. D. at Princeton University. Her research interests include metaphysics (metaphysical realism, grue paradox), feminism and issues at the intersection of language and law. She has recently done work on speech acts and free speech. //mmcgowan@wellesley.edu//
    Jen McWeeny is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at John Carroll University. She received her Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Oregon in 2005 and her M.A. in Philosophy from the University of Hawai’i at Manoa in 2000. Her research interests are in the areas of epistemology, emotion theory, phenomenology, cognitive science, feminist comparative philosophy, and modern philosophy. She has published articles on Simone de Beauvoir, comparative methodology, and emotion theory, and has recently translated an essay by Renaud Barbaras for Research in Phenomenology. She is currently the executive secretary of the Eastern Division of the Society of Women in Philosophy. At present, she is writing a series of articles on feminist phenomenology, embodied cognition, and intersectionality, respectively.
    Sharon M. Meagher, Ph.D. is Chair of the Department of Latin American Studies and Women’s Studies and Professor of Philosophy at The University of Scranton. Meagher also serves as the co-facilitator of the University’s sustainability curriculum workshops. Meagher’s research and teaching interests focus on urban issues, women and development in the global South, and publicly engaged philosophy. She is the co-founder and co-director of the Public Philosophy Network, an organization that fosters and supports publicly engaged social action, teaching, and research projects that involves collaboration between philosophers and various public partners. Her own publicly engaged philosophical work has focused on urban neighborhood community organizing and on building coalitions with women in the global South (particularly in Rwanda and in Mexico). Meagher’s publications include //Philosophy and the City: Classic to Contemporary Writings// (SUNY Press, 2008) and Women and Children First: Feminism, Rhetoric, and Public Policy (SUNY Press, 2006). She is currently completing a monograph, Philosophical Streetwalking (SUNY P); in it she traces the history of Western philosophy's fraught relationship to public life. She maintains a website on teaching philosophy of/in the city.
    Diana Tietjens Meyers
    is Ignacio Ellacuria Chair in Normative/Social Ethics and Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University, Chicago. For many years, she was Professor of Philosophy at the Unive rsity of Connecticut, Storrs. In Spring 2003, she was the Laurie Chair in Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University. She works in four main areas of philosophy – philosophy of action, feminist ethics, human rights theory, and the aesthetics of political art. Her monographs are Inalienable Rights: A Defense (1985, Columbia University Press), Self, Society, and Personal Choice (1989, Columbia University Press), Subjection and Subjectivity: Psychoanalytic Feminism and Moral Philosophy (1994, Routledge), and Gender in the Mirror: Cultural Imagery and Women’s Agency (2002, Oxford University Press; also available through Oxford Scholarship Online). Being Yourself: Essays on Identity, Action, and Social Life is a collection of her (mostly) previously published essays (2004, Rowman and Littlefield). She has edited seven collections and published many journal articles and chapters in books. She is currently editing two issues of Hypatia sponsored by FEAST and working on two books -- one about embodied agency and the other about victims' narratives and human rights.
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  2. page US_WomenInPhilosophy edited ... Christa Davis Acampora is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Hunter College and The Graduate…
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    Christa Davis Acampora is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Hunter College and The Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Her areas of specialization include moral psychology, aesthetics, and contemporary political theory. Most recent publications in these areas include Cultural Sites of Critical Insight: Philosophy, Aesthetics, and African American and Native American Women’s Writings (co-edited with Angela Cotten, 2007) and Unmaking Race, Remaking Soul: Transformative Aesthetics and the Practice of Freedom (co-edited with Angela Cotten, 2007). Formerly, she was the executive secretary of the eastern division of the U.S. Society for Women in Philosophy. She also specializes in modern European philosophy, particularly the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. Currently, she is the executive editor of the Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
    Linda Martín Alcoff teaches philosophy at Hunter College and the City University of New York Graduate Center. She works primarily in continental philosophy, epistemology, feminist theory, and philosophy of race. Her books and anthologies include Feminist Epistemologies (co-edited with Elizabeth Potter, Routledge, 1993), Real Knowing: New Versions of the Coherence Theory of Knowledge (Cornell, 1996), Epistemology: The Big Questions (Blackwell: 1998), Thinking from the Underside of History (co-edited with Eduardo Mendieta, Rowman and Littlefield 2000), Identities (coedited with Eduardo Mendieta, Blackwell 2003), Singing in the Fire: Tales of Women in Philosophy (Rowman and Littlefield 2003) Visible Identities: Race, Gender and the Self (Oxford 2006), Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy (coedited with Eva Kitta, 2006), and Identity Politics Reconsidered (coedited with Hames-Garcia, Mohanty and Moya, Palgrave 2006). She has written dozens of articles on topics concerning Foucault, sexual violence, the politics of knowledge, Latino issues, and gender and race identity.
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    Allen is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Women'sWomen’s and Gender Studies and Chair ofParents Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of PhilosophyHumanities at Dartmouth College.College, where she has taught since 1997. She is
    Babette Babich is a philosopher of science and modern technology with an emphasis on aesthetics. A specialist in Nietzsche and Heidegger as well as Adorno, Hölderlin, Baudrillard, and Bataille, she also writes on the politics of the analytic-continental divide in philosophy as well as the status of women in philosophy. She is author of La fin de la pensée (forthcoming: Paris 2012); The Hallelujah Effect (forthcoming: Aldershot 2012); Nietzsche's Wissenschaftsphilosophie (Oxford/Bern 2010); »Eines Gottes Glück, voller Macht und Liebe« (Weimar 2009); Words in Blood, Like Flowers (Albany 2006); Nietzsche e la scienza (Milan 1996); Nietzsche’s Philosophy of Science (Albany 1994). She is also executive editor of New Nietzsche Studies.
    Alison Bailey directs the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at Illinois State University where she is also an Associate Professor in the Philosophy Department. Her research addresses issues at the intersections of feminist theory, moral and political philosophy, philosophy of race/whiteness studies, and epistemology. Her work has appeared in Hypatia, The Journal of Peace and Justice Studies, Whiteness: Feminist Philosophical Perspectives (1999), Feminist Ethics Revisited (2001), Race and Epistemologies of Ignorance (2007), and The Center Must Not Hold: White Women on the Whiteness of Philosophy (2010). She has co-edited a special issue of Hypatia on “The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body,” with Jacquelyn N. Zita (2007) and reader, The Feminist Philosophy Reader (2008) with Chris J. Cuomo. Her current research addresses questions of race in feminist bioethics, philosophical perspectives on Indian surrogacy, and philosophical responses to intersectionality. Her published work is available through the SSRN Web site:
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